Institute for Integrative Psychotherapy

Formação e Oficinas de Psicoterapia Integrativa

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Shame, Obsession, & Habitual Worrying
A Perspective from Relational and Integrative Psychotherapy

Dr. Richard G. Erskine

New
A two-day workshop: November 29 & 30, 2019
London, UK

Further details and bookings:
https://www.nscience.co.uk/29-and-30-nov-2019.html


Shame and self-righteousness can be viewed as protective dynamics that help avoid vulnerability to humiliation and the loss of contact-in-relationship with others. When our clients have experienced a relationship with another person which is tainted by criticism, ridicule, blaming, ignoring or humiliating behaviours; they face an increased vulnerability in all of their relationships – accompanied by shame, self-righteousness and a loss of self-esteem. Obsession, habitual worrying and repetitive fantasising, either independently manifest or concomitant with shame, absorb much of our clients’ mental activity – interfering with their spontaneity, intimacy and living joyfully in the present. The compounded and continual reinforcement of the belief ‘something is wrong with me’ presents the therapist with complex challenges which are specific and unique to the psychotherapy of shame, obsessions and habitual worrying.

Both unresolved archaic shame and introjected shame for example, potentiate the pain of any current criticism, adding a further layer of toxicity to our clients’ reactions. At the same time, the juxtaposition of the therapist’s inquiry, listening and attunement with the client’s memory of a lack of interpersonal contact in previous significant relationships, produces intense, emotional responses from the client. Rather than experience unmet relational needs again, the client may react defensively to the interpersonal contact offered by the therapist with fear, anger, more worrying or increased shame.

At this workshop, we use lecture, case-discussions and live demonstrations to first look at the interpersonal and intrapersonal dynamics of shame and the psychological defence of self-righteousness. We will examine the relational disruptions in the origin of shame as they occur in family situations, in school, on the playground, in groups and in one’s intimate relationships. Through demonstrations of both individual therapy and the Relational Group Process, we will examine how the healing of shame can occur through respect, contact, authenticity and involvement.
Drawing on object relations and integrative approaches, Dr Erskine then presents a six-point therapeutic plan for the psychotherapy of clients who engage in obsession, habitual worrying and repetitive fantasising. We will explore the psychological functions, script beliefs, processes of avoidance, archaic experiences, relational-needs and self-responsibility that form the foundations of repetitive fantasising, habitual worrying and obsessions. Our six-point plan evaluates how obsession is often an attempt to disavow affect and engage in intellectualisation rather than feel emotions. We will discuss how methods of cognitive understanding, behavioural change, affective expression and relational psychotherapy can be applied in therapy planning – with a view to reclaiming of our clients’ sensitivities to others and their personal sense of contentment.

Contato: nScienceUK
Telefone: + 44 20 7096 1722
E-mail: cpd@nscience.co.uk
Página da Web: https://www.nscience.co.uk/29-and-30-nov-2019.html
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O Instituto para Psicoterapia Integrativa é autorizado pela Associação Americana de Psicologia a oferecer educação continuada para psicólogos, pelo Conselho Nacional de Conselheiros Certificados para aqueles que fazem aconselhamento, e pelo Conselho Americano de Examinadores Pastorais para aconselhamento pastoral. O Instituto para Psicoterapia Integrativa assume a responsabilidade por este programa e seu conteúdo.